Enhancing Industry Data

21 Feb 2018
Indah Rufiati
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Following the Data Management Committee (DMC) meeting in Manado, a meeting focused on enhancing industry data was held on December 8, 2017.

Ibu Riana from Direktorat Pengelolaan Sumber Daya Ikan (PSDI) opened the meeting with a presentation on ‘Logbook and Observer Data Collection in Support of Sustainable Fisheries.’ She emphasized that collaborative management requires that all stakeholders collect fisheries information in order to create better fisheries management. She discussed the legal basis for using logbooks and the issues associated with logbooks including compliance, incomplete data, difficulty filling them out, and more. There are plans to redesign the logbook system, especially with regards to the e-logbook system. Finally, Ibu Riana presented on the observer program, with updates on national numbers.

An active discussion about logbooks followed her presentation, including those companies that are able to comply and others that find it difficult to implement logbooks, especially with small-scale vessels in remote areas. A recommendation to have Dinas Kelautan dan Perikanan (DKP) review logbook implementation with fishermen was suggested.

Allison from MDPI presented about eco-certifications, specifically the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC). She outlined the three main principles behind the MSC certification, along with the 28 indicators of fishery performance. Until now, no capture fisheries in Indonesia have the MSC certificate, but lots of work is being done to achieve it. Reaching MSC is one way to help ensure that fisheries are sustainable. Heri from Asosiasi Perikanan Pole & Line dan Handline Indonesia (AP2HI) gave a follow-up presentation that went into greater detail about the preparation for MSC certification, highlighting the need for members to comply to effective management measures.

Finally, MDPI’s Stephani Mangunsong presented about the new Seafood Import Monitoring Program (SIMP) in the United states and how this might affect Indonesia’s exports to the US. Monitoring tuna imports is one of the priorities of SIMP, though the regulation applies to all seafood species entering the US. All fish entering the US as of January 1, 2018 must participate in the program, submitting data about fishing activities, vessel identification, fishing gear, fish species, landing data and catch area.

There was a positive and enthusiastic response from the suppliers that attended the meeting, with one emphasizing that fishermen and suppliers need to participate in data collection. The supplier said that the important thing is to be proactive, and if there is a need for data, it will be given.

Writer: Allison Stocks

 

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